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Arizona pre-K math standards

Alignments coming soon

IXL's pre-K skills will be aligned to the Arizona Early Learning Standards soon! Until then, you can view a complete list of pre-K standards below. Be sure to check out the unlimited math practice problems in IXL's 42 pre-K skills.

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PK.1 Counting and Cardinality

  • PK.1.1 The child counts out loud and uses number words in daily conversations.

    • PK. To build an understanding of counting, children need environments that are rich in mathematical language and provide varied opportunities to count in ways that are personally meaningful, challenging, and fun.

      • PK.1.1.a Shows interest in and awareness of counting.

      • PK.1.1.b Counts out loud to 10.

  • PK.1.2 The child identifies numerals and uses number words in daily activities.

    • PK. To build an understanding of number names and symbols children need number rich environments that allow them to explore and play with numbers and numerals throughout the day and across the curriculum.

      • PK.1.2.a Uses numerals and number symbols in the context of daily routines, activities, and play.

      • PK.1.2.b Uses and creates symbols to represent numbers.

      • PK.1.2.c Identifies numerals one to 10.

  • PK.1.3 The child uses number words and counting to identify quantity.

    • PK. Learning the meaning of numbers begins with hands-on experiences using a variety of objects found in the home, the classroom and nature. To build an understanding of "how much" and to explore number relationships, children need daily experiences involving counting in ways that are personally meaningful, challenging, and fun.

      • PK.1.3.a Counts groups of objects using one-to-one correspondence (one object for each number word).

      • PK.1.3.b Counts a collection of up to 10 items using the last counting word to tell, "How many?"

      • PK.1.3.c Matches numerals to quantities they represent using physical models and representations.

      • PK.1.3.d Identifies quantity of three-five objects without counting (subitize).

  • PK.1.4 The child applies a range of strategies such as counting or matching to compare sets of objects.

    • PK. Learning the meaning of numbers begins with hands-on experiences, using a variety of objects found in the home, the classroom and nature. To build an understanding of numbers and the quantities they represent, children need daily experiences involving comparing groups of objects in ways that are personally meaningful, challenging, and fun.

      • PK.1.4.a Compares two sets of objects using terms such as more, fewer, or the same.

PK.2 Operations and Algebraic Thinking

  • PK.2.1 The child combines and separates groups of objects and names how many.

    • PK. Learning the meaning of a number begins with hands-on experiences using a variety of objects found in the home, the classroom, and nature. To build an understanding of numbers and to discover number relationships, children need opportunities to describe the changes that result from putting sets of objects (e.g., blocks, animals, toy people) together or taking them apart.

      • PK.2.1.a Demonstrates an understanding that adding increases the number of objects in a group.

      • PK.2.1.b Describes changes in two or more sets of objects when they are combined.

      • PK.2.1.c Demonstrates an understanding that taking away decreases the number of objects in a group.

      • PK.2.1.d Describes changes in a set of objects when they are separated into parts.

  • PK.2.2 The child recognizes, copies, extends, describes and creates patterns.

    • PK. Recognition and investigation of patterns are important components of a child's development. A child's ability to work with patterns is the precursor to mathematical thinking, especially algebraic processes. Children need frequent opportunities to engage in pattern-related activities such as playing with repetitive sounds and movement or noticing patterns in textures and pictures.

      • PK.2.2.a Recognizes patterns in the real world.

      • PK.2.2.b Copies simple patterns.

      • PK.2.2.c Extends simple patterns.

      • PK.2.2.d Creates simple patterns.

      • PK.2.2.e Describes similarities and differences in patterns.

PK.3 Measurement and Data

  • PK.3.1 The child sorts and groups objects by a variety of characteristics/attributes.

    • PK. Recognizing relationships between objects allows young children to make generalizations and predictions beyond information directly available to them. The ability to think logically and to reason (problem solve) extends far beyond mathematical boundaries.

      • PK.3.1.a Sorts and classifies objects by one or more attributes (e.g., size, color, shape, texture, use).

      • PK.3.1.b Explains how items were sorted into groups.

  • PK.3.2 The child collects, organizes, displays, and describes relevant data.

    • PK. Children are natural observers and questioners. To build upon this strength, adults should facilitate children's opportunities to ask questions, sort and classify objects, collect and display information, and talk about what is meaningful to them.

      • PK.3.2.a Asks questions to gather information.

      • PK.3.2.b Displays data to answer simple questions about themselves or the environment.

      • PK.3.2.c Uses descriptive language to compare data in picture graphs or other concrete representations.

      • PK.3.2.d Uses charts and graphs to analyze information or answer questions.

  • PK.3.3 The child uses measurement to describe and compare objects in the environment.

    • PK. Starting at a very young age, children compare who is taller or who has more. Immersing children in measurement activities provides them with opportunities to explore, compare, and discuss the use of measurement in their environment.

      • PK.3.3.a Compares objects and uses terms such as longer-shorter, hotter-colder, and faster-slower.

      • PK.3.3.b Uses non-standard units of measurement (e.g., hands, bodies, containers) to estimate measurable attributes.

      • PK.3.3.c Uses various standard measuring tools for simple measuring tasks.

      • PK.3.3.d Orders objects by measurable attributes.

      • PK.3.3.e Uses appropriate vocabulary to describe time and sequence related to daily routines.

PK.4 Geometry

  • PK.4.1 The child uses and demonstrates an understanding of positional terms.

    • PK. Geometry for young children involves observing, playing with, and purposefully investigating shapes that are found in their environment. Children spontaneously make spatial comparisons. This familiarity is a foundation for more complex learning experiences involving shape, position, and orientation in space.

      • PK.4.1.a Uses and responds to positional terms (e.g., between, inside, under, above, behind).

      • PK.4.1.b Describes the position or location of objects in relation to self or to other objects.

  • PK.4.2 The child recognizes names and describes common shapes and their properties.

    • PK. Geometry for young children involves observing, playing with, and purposefully investigating shapes that are found in their environment. Beginning in infancy, children compare objects by form and shape. This familiarity is a foundation for more complex learning experiences involving shape, position, and orientation in space.

      • PK.4.2.a Recognizes basic two-dimensional shapes.

      • PK.4.2.b Uses the names of geometric shapes when describing objects found in the environment.

      • PK.4.2.c Creates two- and three-dimensional shapes during play.

      • PK.4.2.d Compares and describes attributes of two- and three- dimensional objects in the environment using own vocabulary.