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Skills available for Virginia high school math standards

IXL's high school skills will be aligned to the Virginia Standards of Learning (2016) soon! Until then, you can view a complete list of high school standards below.

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Problem Solving

  • COM.1 The student will design and apply computer programs to solve practical problems in mathematics arising from business and applications in mathematics.

    • COM.1.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • COM.1.a.1 Design and implement computer programs to solve practical problems.

      • COM.1.a.2 Analyze and interpret graphs, charts, and tables in the design and implementation of a computer program.

      • COM.1.a.3 Design and implement computer programs to

        • COM.1.a.3.1 solve practical problems arising from business; and

        • COM.1.a.3.2 solve mathematical problems, using formulas, equations, and functions.

Program Design

  • COM.2 The student will design, write, document, test, and debug a computer program.

    • COM.2.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • COM.2.a.1 Describe a computer program.

      • COM.2.a.2 Design, write, document, test, and debug a complete computer program.

      • COM.2.a.3 List and describe the processes involved in writing a computer program.

      • COM.2.a.4 Describe the function of an algorithm.

      • COM.2.a.5 Provide required documentation for a program.

      • COM.2.a.6 Determine what a given output statement will print.

      • COM.2.a.7 Debug a program.

  • COM.3 The student will write program specifications that define the constraints of a given problem.

    • COM.3.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • COM.3.a.1 Write program specifications that define the constraints of a given problem.

      • COM.3.a.2 Describe the preconditions, postconditions, and desired input and output of a given problem.

      • COM.3.a.3 Determine whether or not a given problem is solvable using a computer program.

  • COM.4 The student will design an algorithm to solve a given problem.

    • COM.4.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • COM.4.a.1 Design a step-by-step algorithm to solve a problem.

  • COM.5 The student will divide a given problem into modules by task and implement the solution.

    • COM.5.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • COM.5.a.1 Divide a problem into modules by task.

      • COM.5.a.2 Write task-oriented modules, which may include

        • COM.5.a.2.1 a user-defined function;

        • COM.5.a.2.2 subroutines; or

        • COM.5.a.2.3 procedures.

      • COM.5.a.3 Determine the need for a subroutine or user-defined function.

      • COM.5.a.4 Determine the difference between and the need for internal and external subroutines and functions.

      • COM.5.a.5 Implement the solution of the problem.

  • COM.6 The student will translate mathematical expressions into programming expressions by declaring variables, writing assignment statements, and using the order of operations.

    • COM.6.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • COM.6.a.1 Translate mathematical expressions into a programming expression.

      • COM.6.a.2 Declare appropriately named variables to store values used in computations.

      • COM.6.a.3 Write variable assignment statements.

      • COM.6.a.4 Use the order of operations to simplify expressions.

      • COM.6.a.5 Construct and evaluate expressions that include multiple arithmetic operations.

  • COM.7 The student will select and call library functions to process data, as appropriate.

    • COM.7.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • COM.7.a.1 Use library functions in designing programs to process data.

      • COM.7.a.2 Use library functions that are arithmetic or string operations.

      • COM.7.a.3 Invoke a value-returning library function.

  • COM.8 The student will implement conditional statements that include "if/then" statements, "if/then/else" statements, case statements, and Boolean logic.

    • COM.8.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • COM.8.a.1 Construct a simple logical (Boolean) expression to evaluate a given condition.

      • COM.8.a.2 Construct an "if/then" statement to perform a specific task.

      • COM.8.a.3 Construct an "if/then/else" statement to perform a specific task.

      • COM.8.a.4 Construct a case statement to perform a specific task.

      • COM.8.a.5 Use conditional statements to incorporate decision making into programs.

  • COM.9 The student will implement pre-defined algorithms, including sort routines, search routines, and simple animation routines.

    • COM.9.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • COM.9.a.1 Implement pre-defined algorithms into a program.

      • COM.9.a.2 Implement a sort routine on a one-dimensional array.

      • COM.9.a.3 Implement a sequential search routine on a one-dimensional array.

      • COM.9.a.4 Implement a binary search routine on a one-dimensional array.

      • COM.9.a.5 Implement a simple animation routine.

Program Implementation

  • COM.10 The student will design and implement the input phase of a program, which will include designing screen layout, getting information into the program by way of user interaction and/or file input, and validating input.

    • COM.10.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • COM.10.a.1 Design a screen layout to facilitate input.

      • COM.10.a.2 Design program information input by user interaction and file input.

      • COM.10.a.3 Validate data, using a variety of methods.

      • COM.10.a.4 Construct input statements to read values into a program.

      • COM.10.a.5 Determine the contents of variables that have been assigned values by input statements.

  • COM.11 The student will design and implement the output phase of a computer program, which will include designing output layout, accessing available output devices, using output statements, and labeling results.

    • COM.11.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • COM.11.a.1 Design an output layout.

      • COM.11.a.2 Access available output devices.

      • COM.11.a.3 Use output statements.

      • COM.11.a.4 Label results.

  • COM.12 The student will design and implement computer graphics to enhance output.

    • COM.12.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • COM.12.a.1 Design and implement computer graphics using various techniques such as

        • COM.12.a.1.1 plotting points or shapes;

        • COM.12.a.1.2 determining and setting window or screen dimensions;

        • COM.12.a.1.3 determining and setting screen or background colors;

        • COM.12.a.1.4 using box commands.

      • COM.12.a.2 Describe the role of graphics in the computer environment.

  • COM.13 The student will implement various mechanisms for performing iteration with an algorithm.

    • COM.13.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • COM.13.a.1 Determine when an iterative algorithm is needed in a computer program.

      • COM.13.a.2 Incorporate single entry point, single exit point, preconditions, and postconditions into iterative algorithms.

  • COM.14 The student will select and implement appropriate data structures, including arrays (one- and/or two-dimensional) and objects.

    • COM.14.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • COM.14.a.1 Implement a one-dimensional or two-dimensional array for a given problem.

        • COM.14.a.1.1 Choose an appropriate data type for an array.

        • COM.14.a.1.2 Assign a value to an array element.

        • COM.14.a.1.3 Fill an array with data, and process the data in the array.

        • COM.14.a.1.4 Access a particular element of a two-dimensional array.

        • COM.14.a.1.5 Process a two-dimensional array by rows and by columns.

        • COM.14.a.1.6 Retrieve data from an array.

      • COM.14.a.2 Use data files in computer programs, both as a source of input data and as a way to save data for the next program execution.

      • COM.14.a.3 Implement objects to consolidate related information of different data types.

Data Manipulation

  • COM.15 The student will define and use appropriate variable data types that include integer, real (fixed and scientific notation), character, string, Boolean, and object.

    • COM.15.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • COM.15.a.1 Define variables using data types, including

        • COM.15.a.1.1 integer;

        • COM.15.a.1.2 real (fixed and scientific notation);

        • COM.15.a.1.3 character;

        • COM.15.a.1.4 string;

        • COM.15.a.1.5 Boolean; and

        • COM.15.a.1.6 object.

      • COM.15.a.2 Use standard naming conventions to create variable names.

  • COM.16 The student will describe the way the computer stores, accesses, and processes variables, including the following topics: the use of variables versus constants, parameter passing, scope of variables, and local versus global variables.

    • COM.16.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • COM.16.a.1 Determine when the use of a variable is appropriate.

      • COM.16.a.2 Describe how a computer stores, accesses, and processes variables.

      • COM.16.a.3 Incorporate parameter passing into programs.

      • COM.16.a.4 Differentiate between local and global variables and describe their appropriate use.

      • COM.16.a.5 Compare and contrast variables and constants.

      • COM.16.a.6 Describe the basic interplay between hardware and software in program execution.

Program Testing

  • COM.17 The student will test a program using an appropriate set of data. The test data should include boundary cases and test all branches of a program.

    • COM.17.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • COM.17.a.1 Test a program, using an appropriate and complete set of data.

      • COM.17.a.2 Demonstrate that a set of data tests all branches of a program.

  • COM.18 The student will debug a program using appropriate techniques (e.g., appropriately placed controlled breaks, the printing of intermediate results, and other debugging tools available in the programming environment), and identify the difference among syntax errors, runtime errors, and logic errors.

    • COM.18.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • COM.18.a.1 Debug a program, using controlled breaks, the printing of intermediate results, and other debugging tools.

      • COM.18.a.2 Identify the differences among syntax errors, runtime errors, and logic errors.