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Skills available for Wisconsin eighth-grade science standards

Standards are in black and IXL science skills are in dark green. Hold your mouse over the name of a skill to view a sample question. Click on the name of a skill to practice that skill.

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SCI.CC1 Students use science and engineering practices, disciplinary core ideas, and patterns to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

  • Patterns

    • SCI.CC1.m Students recognize macroscopic patterns are related to the nature of microscopic and atomic-level structure. They identify patterns in rates of change and other numerical relationships that provide information about natural and human-designed systems. They use patterns to identify cause and effect relationships and use graphs and charts to identify patterns in data.

SCI.CC2 Students use science and engineering practices, disciplinary core ideas, and cause and effect relationships to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

  • Cause and Effect

    • SCI.CC2.m Students classify relationships as causal or correlational, and recognize correlation does not necessarily imply causation. They use cause and effect relationships to predict phenomena in natural or designed systems. They also understand that phenomena may have more than one cause, and some cause and effect relationships in systems can only be explained using probability.

SCI.CC3 Students use science and engineering practices, disciplinary core ideas, and an understanding of scale, proportion and quantity to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

SCI.CC4 Students use science and engineering practices, disciplinary core ideas, and an understanding of systems and models to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

  • Systems and System Models

    • SCI.CC4.m Students understand systems may interact with other systems: they may have sub-systems and be a part of larger complex systems. They use models to represent systems and their interactions—such as inputs, processes, and outputs—and energy, matter, and information flows within systems. They also learn that models are limited in that they only represent certain aspects of the system under study.

SCI.CC5 Students use science and engineering practices, disciplinary core ideas, and an understanding of energy and matter to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

SCI.CC6 Students use science and engineering practices, disciplinary core ideas, and an understanding of structure and function to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

SCI.CC7 Students use science and engineering practices, disciplinary core ideas, and an understanding of stability and change to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

  • Stability and Change

    • SCI.CC7.m Students explain stability and change in natural or designed systems by examining changes over time, and considering forces at different scales, including the atomic scale. They understand changes in one part of a system might cause large changes in another part, systems in dynamic equilibrium are stable due to a balance of feedback mechanisms, and stability might be disturbed by either sudden events or gradual changes that accumulate over time.

SCI.SEP1 Students ask questions and define problems, in conjunction with using crosscutting concepts and disciplinary core ideas, to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

SCI.SEP2 Students develop and use models, in conjunction with using crosscutting concepts and disciplinary core ideas, to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

  • SCI.SEP2.A Developing Models

    • SCI.SEP2.A.m Students develop, use, and revise models to describe, test, and predict more abstract phenomena and design systems. This includes the following:

      • SCI.SEP2.A.m.1 Evaluate limitations of a model for a proposed object or tool.

      • SCI.SEP2.A.m.2 Develop or modify a model—based on evidence—to match what happens if a variable or component of a system is changed.

      • SCI.SEP2.A.m.3 Use and develop a model of simple systems with uncertain and less predictable factors.

      • SCI.SEP2.A.m.4 Develop and/or revise a model to show the relationships among variables, including those that are not observable but predict observable phenomena.

      • SCI.SEP2.A.m.5 Develop and use a model to predict and describe phenomena.

      • SCI.SEP2.A.m.6 Develop a model to describe unobservable mechanisms.

      • SCI.SEP2.A.m.7 Develop and use a model to generate data to test ideas about phenomena in natural or designed systems, including those representing inputs and outputs, and those at unobservable scales.

SCI.SEP3 Students plan and carry out investigations, in conjunction with using crosscutting concepts and disciplinary core ideas, to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

SCI.SEP4 Students analyze and interpret data, in conjunction with using crosscutting concepts and disciplinary core ideas, to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

  • SCI.SEP4.A Analyze and Interpret Data

    • SCI.SEP4.A.m Students extend quantitative analysis to investigations, distinguishing between correlation and causation, and basic statistical techniques of data and error analysis. This includes the following:

      • SCI.SEP4.A.m.1 Construct, analyze, or interpret graphical displays of data and large data sets to identify linear and nonlinear relationships.

      • SCI.SEP4.A.m.2 Use graphical displays (e.g., maps, charts, graphs, and tables) of large data sets to identify temporal and spatial relationships.

      • SCI.SEP4.A.m.3 Distinguish between causal and correlational relationships in data.

      • SCI.SEP4.A.m.4 Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for explanations of phenomena.

      • SCI.SEP4.A.m.5 Apply concepts of statistics and probability (including mean, median, mode, and variability) to analyze and characterize data, using digital tools when feasible.

      • SCI.SEP4.A.m.6 Consider limitations of data analysis (e.g., measurement error), and seek to improve precision and accuracy of data with better technological tools and methods (e.g., multiple trials).

      • SCI.SEP4.A.m.7 Analyze and interpret data to determine similarities and differences in findings.

      • SCI.SEP4.A.m.8 Analyze data to define an optimal operational range for a proposed object, tool, process, or system that best meets criteria for success.

SCI.SEP5 Students use mathematics and computational thinking, in conjunction with using crosscutting concepts and disciplinary core ideas, to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

SCI.SEP6 Students construct explanations and design solutions, in conjunction with using crosscutting concepts and disciplinary core ideas, to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

SCI.SEP7 Students engage in argument from evidence, in conjunction with using crosscutting concepts and disciplinary core ideas, to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

  • SCI.SEP7.A Argue from Evidence

    • SCI.SEP7.A.m Students construct a convincing argument that supports or refutes claims for either explanations or solutions about the natural and designed world. This includes the following:

      • SCI.SEP7.A.m.1 Compare and critique two arguments on the same topic. Analyze whether they emphasize similar or different evidence and interpretations of facts.

      • SCI.SEP7.A.m.2 Respectfully provide and receive critiques about one's explanations, procedures, models, and questions by citing relevant evidence and posing and responding to questions that elicit pertinent elaboration and detail.

      • SCI.SEP7.A.m.3 Construct, use, and present oral and written arguments supported by empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support or refute an explanation or a model for a phenomenon or a solution to a problem.

      • SCI.SEP7.A.m.4 Make an oral or written argument that supports or refutes the advertised performance of a device, process, or system. Based the argument on empirical evidence concerning whether or not the technology meets relevant criteria and constraints.

      • SCI.SEP7.A.m.5 Evaluate competing design solutions based on jointly developed and agreed-upon design criteria.

SCI.SEP8 Students will obtain, evaluate and communicate information, in conjunction with using crosscutting concepts and disciplinary core ideas, to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

  • SCI.SEP8.A Obtain, Evaluate, and Communicate Information

    • SCI.SEP8.A.m Students evaluate the merit and validity of ideas and methods. This includes the following:

      • SCI.SEP8.A.m.1 Critically read scientific texts adapted for classroom use to determine the central ideas, to obtain scientific and technical information, and to describe patterns in and evidence about the natural and designed world(s).

      • SCI.SEP8.A.m.2 Clarify claims and findings by integrating text-based qualitative and quantitative scientific information with information contained in media and visual displays.

      • SCI.SEP8.A.m.3 Gather, read, and synthesize information from multiple appropriate sources and assess the credibility, accuracy, and possible bias of each publication. Describe how they are supported or not supported by evidence and evaluate methods used.

      • SCI.SEP8.A.m.4 Evaluate data, hypotheses, and conclusions in scientific and technical texts in light of competing information or accounts.

      • SCI.SEP8.A.m.5 Communicate scientific and technical information (e.g., about a proposed object, tool, process, or system) in writing and through oral presentations.

SCI.LS Life Science

SCI.PS Physical Science

SCI.ESS Earth and Space Science

SCI.ETS Engineering, Technology, and the Application of Science

  • SCI.ETS1 Students use science and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and an understanding of engineering design to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

    • SCI.ETS1.A Defining and Delimiting Engineering Problems

      • SCI.ETS1.A.m The more precisely a design task's criteria and constraints can be defined, the more likely it is that the designed solution will be successful. Specification of constraints includes consideration of scientific principles and other relevant knowledge that are likely to limit possible solutions.

    • SCI.ETS1.B Developing Possible Solutions

      • SCI.ETS1.B.m.i A solution needs to be tested and then modified on the basis of the test results in order to improve it.

      • SCI.ETS1.B.m.ii There are systematic processes for evaluating solutions with respect to how well they meet the criteria and constraints of a problem.

      • SCI.ETS1.B.m.iii Sometimes parts of different solutions can be combined to create a solution that is better than any of its predecessors.

      • SCI.ETS1.B.m.iv Models of all kinds are important for testing solutions.

    • SCI.ETS1.C Optimizing the Design Solution

      • SCI.ETS1.C.m.i Although one design may not perform the best across all tests, identifying the characteristics of the design that performed the best in each test can provide useful information for the redesign process—that is, some of those characteristics may be incorporated into the new design.

      • SCI.ETS1.C.m.ii The iterative process of testing the most promising solutions and modifying what is proposed on the basis of the test results leads to greater refinement and ultimately to an optimal solution.

  • SCI.ETS2 Students use science and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and an understanding of the links among Engineering, Technology, Science, and Society to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

    • SCI.ETS2.A Interdependence of Science, Engineering, and Technology

    • SCI.ETS2.B Influence of Engineering, Technology, and Science on Society and the Natural World

      • SCI.ETS2.B.m.i All human activity draws on natural resources and has both short and long-term consequences, positive as well as negative, for the health of people and the natural environment.

      • SCI.ETS2.B.m.ii The uses of technologies are driven by people's needs, desires, and values; by the findings of scientific research; and by differences in such factors as climate, natural resources, and economic conditions.

      • SCI.ETS2.B.m.iii Technology use varies over time and from region to region.

  • SCI.ETS3 Students use science and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and an understanding of the nature of science and engineering to make sense of phenomena and solve problems.

    • SCI.ETS3.A Science and Engineering Are Human Endeavors

      • SCI.ETS3.A.m.i Individuals and teams from many nations, cultures and backgrounds have contributed to advances in science and engineering.

      • SCI.ETS3.A.m.ii Scientists and engineers are persistent, use creativity, reasoning, and skepticism, and remain open to new ideas.

      • SCI.ETS3.A.m.iii Science and engineering are influenced by what is valued in society.

    • SCI.ETS3.B Science and Engineering Are Unique Ways of Thinking with Different Purposes

      • SCI.ETS3.B.m.i Science asks questions to understand the natural world and assumes that objects and events in natural systems occur in consistent patterns that are understandable through measurement and observation. Science carefully considers and evaluates anomalies in data and evidence.

      • SCI.ETS3.B.m.ii Engineering seeks solutions to human problems, including issues that arise due to human interaction with the environment. It uses some of the same practices as science and often applies scientific principles to solutions.

      • SCI.ETS3.B.m.iii Science and engineering have direct impacts on the quality of life for all people. Therefore, scientists and engineers need to pursue their work in an ethical manner that requires honesty, fairness and dedication to public health, safety and welfare.

    • SCI.ETS3.C Science and Engineering Use Multiple Approaches to Create New Knowledge and Solve Problems

      • SCI.ETS3.C.m.i A theory is an explanation of some aspect of the natural world. Scientists develop theories by using multiple approaches. Validity of these theories and explanations is increased through a peer review process that tests and evaluates the evidence supporting scientific claims.

      • SCI.ETS3.C.m.ii Theories are explanations for observable phenomena based on a body of evidence developed over time. A hypothesis is a statement that can be tested to evaluate a theory. Scientific laws describe cause and effect relationships among observable phenomena.

      • SCI.ETS3.C.m.iii Engineers develop solutions using multiple approaches and evaluate their solutions against criteria such as cost, safety, time and performance. This evaluation often involves trade-offs between constraints to find the optimal solution.