Virginia

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Skills available for Virginia first-grade math standards

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Number and Number Sense

  • 1.1 The student will a) count forward orally by ones to 110, starting at any number between 0 and 110; b) write the numerals 0 to 110 in sequence and out-of-sequence; c) count backward orally by ones when given any number between 1 and 30; and d) count forward orally by ones, twos, fives, and tens to determine the total number of objects to 110.

  • 1.2 The student, given up to 110 objects, will a) group a collection into tens and ones and write the corresponding numeral; b) compare two numbers between 0 and 110 represented pictorially or with concrete objects, using the words greater than, less than or equal to; and c) order three or fewer sets from least to greatest and greatest to least.

    • 1.2.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

  • 1.3 The student, given an ordered set of ten objects and/or pictures, will indicate the ordinal position of each object, first through tenth.

    • 1.3.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • 1.3.a.1 Identify the ordinal positions first through tenth using ordered sets of 10 objects and/or pictures of such sets presented from:

        • 1.3.a.1.1 left to right;

        • 1.3.a.1.2 right to left;

        • 1.3.a.1.3 top to bottom; and/or

        • 1.3.a.1.4 bottom to top.

  • 1.4 The student will a) represent and solve practical problems involving equal sharing with two or four sharers; and b) represent and name fractions for halves and fourths, using models.

    • 1.4.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • 1.4.a.1 Share a whole equally with two or four sharers, when given a practical situation. (a)

      • 1.4.a.2 Represent fair shares pictorially, when given a practical situation. (a)

      • 1.4.a.3 Describe shares as equal pieces or parts of the whole (e.g., halves, fourths), when given a practical situation. (a)

      • 1.4.a.4 Represent halves and fourths of a whole, using a region/area model (e.g., pie pieces, pattern blocks, paper folding, and drawings). (b)

      • 1.4.a.5 Name fractions represented by drawings or concrete materials for halves and fourths. (b)

  • 1.5 The student, given a familiar problem situation involving magnitude, will a) select a reasonable order of magnitude from three given quantities: a one-digit numeral, a two-digit numeral, and a three-digit numeral (e.g., 5, 50, 500); and b) explain the reasonableness of the choice.

    • 1.5.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • 1.5.a.1 Select a reasonable order of magnitude for a given set from three given quantities: a one-digit numeral, a two-digit numeral, and a three-digit numeral (e.g., 5, 50, or 500 jelly beans in jars) in a familiar problem situation. (a)

      • 1.5.a.2 Explain why a particular estimate was chosen as the most reasonable from three given quantities (a one-digit numeral, a two-digit numeral, and a three-digit numeral), given a familiar problem situation. (b)

Computation and Estimation

Measurement and Geometry

  • 1.8 The student will determine the value of a collection of like coins (pennies, nickels, or dimes) whose total value is 100 cents or less.

    • 1.8.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • 1.8.a.1 Count by ones to determine the value of a collection of pennies whose total value is 100 cents or less.

      • 1.8.a.2 Group a collection of pennies by fives and tens as a way to determine the value. The total value of the collection is 100 cents or less.

      • 1.8.a.3 Count by fives to determine the value of a collection of nickels whose total value is 100 cents or less.

      • 1.8.a.4 Count by tens to determine the value of a collection of dimes whose total value is 100 cents or less.

  • 1.9 The student will investigate the passage of time and a) tell time to the hour and half-hour, using analog and digital clocks; and b) read and interpret a calendar.

    • 1.9.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

  • 1.10 The student will use nonstandard units to measure and compare length, weight, and volume.

    • 1.10.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • 1.10.a.1 Measure the length of objects, using various nonstandard units (e.g., connecting cubes, paper clips, erasers).

      • 1.10.a.2 Compare the length of two objects, using the terms longer/shorter, taller/shorter, or same as.

      • 1.10.a.3 Measure the weight of objects, using a balance or pan scale with various nonstandard units (e.g., paper clips, bean bags, cubes).

      • 1.10.a.4 Identify a balance scale or a pan scale as a tool for measuring weight.

      • 1.10.a.5 Compare the weight of two objects, using the terms lighter, heavier, or the same, using a balance scale.

      • 1.10.a.6 Measure the volume of objects, using various nonstandard units (e.g., connecting cubes, blocks, rice, water).

      • 1.10.a.7 Compare the volumes of two containers to determine whether the volume of one is more, less, or equivalent to the other, using nonstandard units of measure (e.g., a spoonful or scoopful of rice, sand, jelly beans).

      • 1.10.a.8 Compare the volumes of two containers to determine whether the volume of one is more, less, or equivalent to the other by pouring the contents of one container into the other.

  • 1.11 The student will a) Identify, trace, describe, and sort plane figures (triangles, squares, rectangles, and circles) according to number of sides, vertices, and angles; and b) identify and describe representations of circles, squares, rectangles, and triangles in different environments, regardless of orientation, and explain reasoning.

    • 1.11.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • 1.11.a.1 Identify the name of the plane figure when given information about the number of sides, vertices, and angles. (a)

      • 1.11.a.2 Trace triangles, squares, rectangles, and circles. (a)

      • 1.11.a.3 Describe a circle using terms such as round and curved. (a)

      • 1.11.a.4 Describe triangles, squares, and rectangles by the number of sides, vertices, and angles. (a)

      • 1.11.a.5 Recognize that rectangles and squares have special types of angles called right angles. (a)

      • 1.11.a.6 Sort plane figures based on their characteristics (number of sides, vertices, angles, curved, etc.). (a)

      • 1.11.a.7 Identify and describe representations of circles, squares, rectangles, and triangles, regardless of orientation, in different environments and explain reasoning. (b)

Probability and Statistics

  • 1.12 The student will a) collect, organize, and represent various forms of data using tables, picture graphs, and object graphs; and b) read and interpret data displayed in tables, picture graphs, and object graphs, using the vocabulary more, less, fewer, greater than, less than, and equal to.

    • 1.12.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • 1.12.a.1 Collect and organize data using various forms of data collection (e.g., counting and tallying, informal surveys, observations, voting). Data points, collected by students, should be limited to 16 or fewer for no more than four categories. (a)

      • 1.12.a.2 Represent data in tables, picture graphs, and object graphs. (a)

      • 1.12.a.3 Analyze information displayed in tables, picture graphs, and object graphs (horizontally or vertically represented):

Patterns, Functions, and Algebra