Virginia

Virginia flag
Skills available for Virginia third-grade math standards

Standards are in black and IXL math skills are in dark green. Hold your mouse over the name of a skill to view a sample question. Click on the name of a skill to practice that skill.

Show alignments for:

Actions

Number and Number Sense

Computation and Estimation

Measurement and Geometry

  • 3.6 The student will a) determine the value of a collection of bills and coins whose total value is $5.00 or less; b) compare the value of two sets of coins or two sets of coins and bills; and c) make change from $5.00 or less.

    • 3.6.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

  • 3.7 The student will estimate and use U.S. Customary and metric units to measure a) length to the nearest 1/2 inch, inch, foot, yard, centimeter, and meter; and b) liquid volume in cups, pints, quarts, gallons, and liters.

  • 3.8 The student will estimate and a) measure the distance around a polygon in order to determine its perimeter using U.S. Customary and metric units; and b) count the number of square units needed to cover a given surface in order to determine its area.

  • 3.9 The student will a) tell time to the nearest minute, using analog and digital clocks; b) solve practical problems related to elapsed time in one-hour increments within a 12-hour period; and c) identify equivalent periods of time and solve practical problems related to equivalent periods of time.

    • 3.9.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • 3.9.a.1 Tell time to the nearest minute, using analog and digital clocks. (a)

      • 3.9.a.2 Match a written time (e.g., 4:38, 7:09, 12:51) to the time shown on analog and digital clocks to the nearest minute. (a)

      • 3.9.a.3 Solve practical problems related to elapsed time in one-hour increments, within a 12-hour period (within a.m. or within p.m.):

        • 3.9.a.3.1 when given the beginning time and the ending time, determine the time that has elapsed; (b)

        • 3.9.a.3.2 when given the beginning time and amount of elapsed time in one-hour increments, determine the ending time; or (b)

        • 3.9.a.3.3 when given the ending time and the elapsed time in one-hour increments, determine the beginning time. (b)

      • 3.9.a.4 Identify the number of minutes in an hour and the number of hours in a day. (c)

      • 3.9.a.5 Identify equivalent relationships observed in a calendar, including the approximate number of days in a given month (about 30), the number of days in a week, the number of days in a year (about 365 1/4), and the number of months in a year. (c)

      • 3.9.a.6 Solve practical problems related to equivalent periods of time to include:

        • 3.9.a.6.1 approximate days in five or fewer months;

        • 3.9.a.6.2 days in five or fewer weeks;

        • 3.9.a.6.3 months in five or fewer years;

        • 3.9.a.6.4 minutes in five or fewer hours; and

        • 3.9.a.6.5 hours in five or fewer days. (c)

  • 3.10 The student will read temperature to the nearest degree.

    • 3.10.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • 3.10.a.1 Read Celsius and Fahrenheit temperatures to the nearest degree using real thermometers, physical models, or pictorial representations.

  • 3.11 The student will identify and draw representations of points, lines, line segments, rays, and angles.

    • 3.11.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • 3.11.a.1 Identify examples of points, lines, line segments, rays, and angles.

      • 3.11.a.2 Describe endpoints and vertices as they relate to lines, line segments, rays, and angles.

      • 3.11.a.3 Draw representations of points, line segments, rays, angles, and lines, using a ruler or straightedge.

  • 3.12 The student will a) define polygon; b) identify and name polygons with 10 or fewer sides; and c) combine and subdivide polygons with three or four sides and name the resulting polygon(s).

  • 3.13 The student will identify and describe congruent and noncongruent figures.

    • 3.13.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • 3.13.a.1 Identify examples of congruent and noncongruent figures.

      • 3.13.a.2 Determine and explain why plane figures are congruent or noncongruent.

Probability and Statistics

  • 3.14 The student will investigate and describe the concept of probability as a measurement of chance and list possible outcomes for a single event.

    • 3.14.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • 3.14.a.1 Define probability as the measurement of chance that an event will happen.

      • 3.14.a.2 List all possible outcomes for a single event (e.g., heads and tails are the two possible outcomes of flipping a coin). Limit the number of outcomes to 12 or fewer.

      • 3.14.a.3 Describe the degree of likelihood of an outcome occurring using terms such as impossible, unlikely, equally likely, likely, and certain.

  • 3.15 The student will a) collect, organize, and represent data in pictographs or bar graphs; and b) read and interpret data represented in pictographs and bar graphs.

    • 3.15.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • 3.15.a.1 Formulate questions to investigate. (a)

      • 3.15.a.2 Design data investigations to answer formulated questions, limiting the number of categories for data collection to four. (a)

      • 3.15.a.3 Collect and organize data, using various forms of data collections (e.g., surveys, polls, questionnaires, scientific experiments, observations). (a)

      • 3.15.a.4 Represent data in a pictograph (limited to 16 or fewer data points for no more than four categories). (a)

      • 3.15.a.5 Represent data in a bar graph (limited to 16 or fewer data points for no more than four categories). (a)

        • 3.15.a.5.1 Label each axis on a bar graph and give the bar graph a title. Limit increments on the numerical axis to whole numbers representing multiples of 1, 2, 5, or 10. (a)

      • 3.15.a.6 Analyze data represented in pictographs and bar graphs, orally and in writing. (b)

        • 3.15.a.6.1 Read the information presented on a bar or pictograph (e.g., the title, the categories, the description of the two axes). (b)

      • 3.15.a.7 Interpret information from pictographs and bar graphs, with up to 30 data points and up to eight categories, describe interpretation orally and by writing at least one sentence. (b)

Patterns, Functions, and Algebra