Virginia

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Skills available for Virginia fourth-grade math standards

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Number and Number Sense

Computation and Estimation

Measurement and Geometry

  • 4.7 The student will solve practical problems that involve determining perimeter and area in U.S. Customary and metric units.

  • 4.8 The student will a) estimate and measure length and describe the result in U.S. Customary and metric units; b) estimate and measure weight/mass and describe the result in U.S. Customary and metric units; c) given the equivalent measure of one unit, identify equivalent measures of length, weight/mass, and liquid volume between units within the U.S. Customary system; and d) solve practical problems that involve length, weight/mass, and liquid volume in U.S. Customary units.

    • 4.8.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • 4.8.a.1 Determine an appropriate unit of measure (inch, foot, yard, mile, millimeter, centimeter, and meter) to use when measuring length in both U.S. Customary and metric units. (a)

      • 4.8.a.2 Estimate and measure length in U.S. Customary and metric units, measuring to the nearest part of an inch (1/2, 1/4, 1/8), and to the nearest foot, yard, millimeter, centimeter, or meter, and record the length including the unit of measure (e.g., 24 inches). (a)

      • 4.8.a.3 Compare estimates of the length with the actual measurement of the length. (a)

      • 4.8.a.4 Determine an appropriate unit of measure (ounce, pound, gram, and kilogram) to use when measuring the weight/mass of everyday objects in both U.S. Customary and metric units. (b)

      • 4.8.a.5 Estimate and measure the weight/mass of objects in both U.S. Customary and metric units (ounce, pound, gram, or kilogram) to the nearest appropriate measure, using a variety of measuring instruments. (b)

      • 4.8.a.6 Record the weight/mass of an object with the unit of measure (e.g., 24 grams). (b)

      • 4.8.a.7 Given the equivalent measure of one unit, identify equivalent measures between units within the U.S. Customary system for:

      • 4.8.a.8 Solve practical problems that involve length, weight/mass, and liquid volume in U.S. Customary units. (d)

  • 4.9 The student will solve practical problems related to elapsed time in hours and minutes within a 12-hour period.

    • 4.9.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

  • 4.10 The student will a) identify and describe points, lines, line segments, rays, and angles, including endpoints and vertices; and b) identify and describe intersecting, parallel, and perpendicular lines.

  • 4.11 The student will identify, describe, compare, and contrast plane and solid figures according to their characteristics (number of angles, vertices, edges, and the number and shape of faces) using concrete models and pictorial representations.

    • 4.11.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

  • 4.12 The student will classify quadrilaterals as parallelograms, rectangles, squares, rhombi, and/or trapezoids.

Probability and Statistics

  • 4.13 The student will a) determine the likelihood of an outcome of a simple event; b) represent probability as a number between 0 and 1, inclusive; and c) create a model or practical problem to represent a given probability.

    • 4.13.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • 4.13.a.1 Model and determine all possible outcomes of a given simple event where there are no more than 24 possible outcomes, using a variety of manipulatives (e.g., coins, number cubes, and spinners). (a)

      • 4.13.a.2 Determine the outcome of an event that is least likely to occur or most likely to occur where there are no more than 24 possible outcomes. (a)

      • 4.13.a.3 Write the probability of a given simple event as a fraction, where there are no more than 24 possible outcomes. (b)

      • 4.13.a.4 Determine the likelihood of an event occurring and relate it to its whole number or fractional representation (e.g., impossible or zero; equally likely; certain or one). (a, b)

      • 4.13.a.5 Create a model or practical problem to represent a given probability. (c)

  • 4.14 The student will a) collect, organize, and represent data in bar graphs and line graphs; b) interpret data represented in bar graphs and line graphs; and c) compare two different representations of the same data (e.g., a set of data displayed on a chart and a bar graph, a chart and a line graph, or a pictograph and a bar graph).

    • 4.14.a The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

      • 4.14.a.1 Collect data, using, for example, observations, measurement, surveys, scientific experiments, polls, or questionnaires. (a)

      • 4.14.a.2 Organize data into a chart or table. (a)

      • 4.14.a.3 Represent data in bar graphs, labeling one axis with equal whole number increments of one or more (numerical data) (e.g., 2, 5, 10, or 100) and the other axis with categories related to the title of the graph (categorical data) (e.g., swimming, fishing, boating, and water skiing as the categories of "Favorite Summer Sports"). (a)

      • 4.14.a.4 Represent data in line graphs, labeling the vertical axis with equal whole number increments of one or more and the horizontal axis with continuous data commonly related to time (e.g., hours, days, months, years. Line graphs will have no more than 10 identified points along a continuum for continuous data. (a)

      • 4.14.a.5 Title the graph or identify an appropriate title. Label the axes or identify the appropriate labels. (a)

      • 4.14.a.6 Interpret data by making observations from bar graphs and line graphs by describing the characteristics of the data and the data as a whole (e.g., the time period when the temperature increased the most, the category with the greatest/least, categories with the same number of responses, similarities and differences, the total number). One set of data will be represented on a graph. (b)

      • 4.14.a.7 Interpret data by making inferences from bar graphs and line graphs. (b)

      • 4.14.a.8 Interpret the data to answer the question posed, and compare the answer to the prediction (e.g., "The summer sport preferred by most is swimming, which is what I predicted before collecting the data."). (b)

      • 4.14.a.9 Write at least one sentence to describe the analysis and interpretation of the data, identifying parts of the data that have special characteristics, including categories with the greatest, the least, or the same. (b)

      • 4.14.a.10 Compare two different representations of the same data (e.g., a set of data displayed on a chart and a bar graph; a chart and a line graph; a pictograph and a bar graph). (c)

Patterns, Functions, and Algebra