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Skills available for Florida sixth-grade science standards

Standards are in black and IXL science skills are in dark green. Hold your mouse over the name of a skill to view a sample question. Click on the name of a skill to practice that skill.

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SC.6.E Earth and Space Science

  • SC.6.E.6 Over geologic time, internal and external sources of energy have continuously altered the features of Earth by means of both constructive and destructive forces. All life, including human civilization, is dependent on Earth's internal and external energy and material resources.

    • SC.6.E.6.1 Describe and give examples of ways in which Earth's surface is built up and torn down by physical and chemical weathering, erosion, and deposition.

    • SC.6.E.6.2 Recognize that there are a variety of different landforms on Earth's surface such as coastlines, dunes, rivers, mountains, glaciers, deltas, and lakes and relate these landforms as they apply to Florida.

  • SC.6.E.7 The scientific theory of the evolution of Earth states that changes in our planet are driven by the flow of energy and the cycling of matter through dynamic interactions among the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, geosphere, and biosphere, and the resources used to sustain human civilization on Earth.

    • SC.6.E.7.1 Differentiate among radiation, conduction, and convection, the three mechanisms by which heat is transferred through Earth's system.

    • SC.6.E.7.2 Investigate and apply how the cycling of water between the atmosphere and hydrosphere has an effect on weather patterns and climate.

    • SC.6.E.7.3 Describe how global patterns such as the jet stream and ocean currents influence local weather in measurable terms such as temperature, air pressure, wind direction and speed, and humidity and precipitation.

    • SC.6.E.7.4 Differentiate and show interactions among the geosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere.

    • SC.6.E.7.5 Explain how energy provided by the sun influences global patterns of atmospheric movement and the temperature differences between air, water, and land.

    • SC.6.E.7.6 Differentiate between weather and climate.

    • SC.6.E.7.7 Investigate how natural disasters have affected human life in Florida.

    • SC.6.E.7.8 Describe ways human beings protect themselves from hazardous weather and sun exposure.

    • SC.6.E.7.9 Describe how the composition and structure of the atmosphere protects life and insulates the planet.

SC.6.L Life Science

SC.6.N Nature of Science

  • SC.6.N.1 The Practice of Science

    • A Scientific inquiry is a multifaceted activity; The processes of science include the formulation of scientifically investigable questions, construction of investigations into those questions, the collection of appropriate data, the evaluation of the meaning of those data, and the communication of this evaluation.

    • B The processes of science frequently do not correspond to the traditional portrayal of "the scientific method."

    • C Scientific argumentation is a necessary part of scientific inquiry and plays an important role in the generation and validation of scientific knowledge.

    • D Scientific knowledge is based on observation and inference; it is important to recognize that these are very different things. Not only does science require creativity in its methods and processes, but also in its questions and explanations.

    • SC.6.N.1.1 Define a problem from the sixth grade curriculum, use appropriate reference materials to support scientific understanding, plan and carry out scientific investigation of various types, such as systematic observations or experiments, identify variables, collect and organize data, interpret data in charts, tables, and graphics, analyze information, make predictions, and defend conclusions.

    • SC.6.N.1.2 Explain why scientific investigations should be replicable.

    • SC.6.N.1.3 Explain the difference between an experiment and other types of scientific investigation, and explain the relative benefits and limitations of each.

    • SC.6.N.1.4 Discuss, compare, and negotiate methods used, results obtained, and explanations among groups of students conducting the same investigation.

    • SC.6.N.1.5 Recognize that science involves creativity, not just in designing experiments, but also in creating explanations that fit evidence.

  • SC.6.N.2 The Characteristics of Scientific Knowledge

    • A Scientific knowledge is based on empirical evidence, and is appropriate for understanding the natural world, but it provides only a limited understanding of the supernatural, aesthetic, or other ways of knowing, such as art, philosophy, or religion.

    • B Scientific knowledge is durable and robust, but open to change.

    • C Because science is based on empirical evidence it strives for objectivity, but as it is a human endeavor the processes, methods, and knowledge of science include subjectivity, as well as creativity and discovery.

    • SC.6.N.2.1 Distinguish science from other activities involving thought.

    • SC.6.N.2.2 Explain that scientific knowledge is durable because it is open to change as new evidence or interpretations are encountered.

    • SC.6.N.2.3 Recognize that scientists who make contributions to scientific knowledge come from all kinds of backgrounds and possess varied talents, interests, and goals.

  • SC.6.N.3 The terms that describe examples of scientific knowledge, for example; "theory," "law," "hypothesis," and "model" have very specific meanings and functions within science.

    • SC.6.N.3.1 Recognize and explain that a scientific theory is a well-supported and widely accepted explanation of nature and is not simply a claim posed by an individual. Thus, the use of the term theory in science is very different than how it is used in everyday life.

    • SC.6.N.3.2 Recognize and explain that a scientific law is a description of a specific relationship under given conditions in the natural world. Thus, scientific laws are different from societal laws.

    • SC.6.N.3.3 Give several examples of scientific laws.

    • SC.6.N.3.4 Identify the role of models in the context of the sixth grade science benchmarks.

SC.6.P Physical Science

  • SC.6.P.11 Energy Transfer and Transformations

    • A Waves involve a transfer of energy without a transfer of matter.

    • B Water and sound waves transfer energy through a material.

    • C Light waves can travel through a vacuum and through matter.

    • D The Law of Conservation of Energy: Energy is conserved as it transfers from one object to another and from one form to another.

    • SC.6.P.11.1 Explore the Law of Conservation of Energy by differentiating between potential and kinetic energy. Identify situations where kinetic energy is transformed into potential energy and vice versa.

  • SC.6.P.12 Motion of Objects

    • A Motion is a key characteristic of all matter that can be observed, described, and measured.

    • B The motion of objects can be changed by forces.

    • SC.6.P.12.1 Measure and graph distance versus time for an object moving at a constant speed. Interpret this relationship.

  • SC.6.P.13 Forces and Changes in Motion

    • A It takes energy to change the motion of objects.

    • B Energy change is understood in terms of forces--pushes or pulls.

    • C Some forces act through physical contact, while others act at a distance.

    • SC.6.P.13.1 Investigate and describe types of forces including contact forces and forces acting at a distance, such as electrical, magnetic, and gravitational.

    • SC.6.P.13.2 Explore the Law of Gravity by recognizing that every object exerts gravitational force on every other object and that the force depends on how much mass the objects have and how far apart they are.

    • SC.6.P.13.3 Investigate and describe that an unbalanced force acting on an object changes its speed, or direction of motion, or both.