Oklahoma

Oklahoma flag
Skills available for Oklahoma fourth-grade science standards

Standards are in black and IXL science skills are in dark green. Hold your mouse over the name of a skill to view a sample question. Click on the name of a skill to practice that skill.

Show alignments for:

Actions

PS3 Energy

  • 4.PS3.1 Use evidence to construct an explanation relating the speed of an object to the energy of that object.

    • 4.PS3.1.1 The faster a given object is moving, the more energy it possesses.

  • 4.PS3.2 Make observations to provide evidence that energy can be transferred from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents.

    • 4.PS3.2.1 Energy can be moved from place to place by moving objects or through sound, light, or electric currents.

    • 4.PS3.2.2 Energy is present whenever there are moving objects, sound, light, or heat.

    • 4.PS3.2.3 When objects collide, energy can be transferred from one object to another, thereby changing their motion. In such collisions, some energy is typically also transferred to the surrounding air; as a result, the air gets heated and sound is produced.

    • 4.PS3.2.4 Light also transfers energy from place to place.

    • 4.PS3.2.5 Energy can also be transferred from place to place by electric currents, which can then be used locally to produce motion, sound, heat, or light.

  • 4.PS3.3 Ask questions and predict outcomes about the changes in energy that occur when objects collide.

    • 4.PS3.3.1 When objects collide, energy can be transferred from one object to another, thereby changing their motion. In such collisions, some energy is typically also transferred to the surrounding air; as a result, the air gets heated and sound is produced.

    • 4.PS3.3.2 When objects collide, the contact forces transfer energy so as to change the objects' motions.

  • 4.PS3.4 Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another.

    • 4.PS3.4.1 Energy can be transferred from place to place by electric currents, which can then be used locally to produce motion, sound, heat, or light. The currents may have been produced to begin with by transforming the energy of motion into electrical energy.

    • 4.PS3.4.2 The expression "produce energy" typically refers to the conversion of stored energy into a desired form for practical use.

    • 4.PS3.4.3 Possible solutions to a problem are limited by available materials and resources (constraints). Different proposals for solutions can be compared on the basis of how well each one meets the specified criteria for success or how well each takes the constraints into account.

    • 4.PS3.4.4 The success of a designed solution is determined by considering the desired features of a solution (criteria).

    • 4.PS3.4.5 Engineers improve existing technologies or develop new ones.

PS4 Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer

  • 4.PS4.1 Develop and use a model of waves to describe patterns in terms of amplitude and wavelength, and to show that waves can cause objects to move.

    • 4.PS4.1.1 Waves, which are regular patterns of motion, can be made in water by disturbing the surface.

    • 4.PS4.1.2 When waves move across the surface of deep water, the water goes up and down in place; there is no net motion in the direction of the wave except when the water meets a beach.

    • 4.PS4.1.3 Waves of the same type can differ in amplitude (height of the wave) and wavelength (spacing between wave peaks).

  • 4.PS4.2 Develop a model to describe that light reflecting from objects and entering the eye allows objects to be seen.

    • 4.PS4.2.1 An object can be seen when light reflected from its surface enters the eyes.

  • 4.PS4.3 Generate and compare multiple solutions that use patterns to transfer information.

    • 4.PS4.3.1 Digitized information can be transmitted over long distances without significant degradation.

    • 4.PS4.3.2 High-tech devices, such as computers or cell phones, can receive and decode information—convert it from digitized form to voice—and vice versa.

    • 4.PS4.3.3 Different solutions need to be tested in order to determine which of them best solves the problem, given the criteria and the constraints.

LS1 From Molecules to Organisms: Structure and Processes

ESS1 Earth's Place in the Universe

ESS2 Earth's Systems

  • 4.ESS2.1 Plan and conduct investigations on the effects of water, ice, wind, and vegetation on the relative rate of weathering and erosion.

  • 4.ESS2.2 Analyze and interpret data from maps to describe patterns of Earth's features.

    • 4.ESS2.2.1 The locations of mountain ranges, deep ocean trenches, ocean floor structures, earthquakes, and volcanoes occur in patterns.

    • 4.ESS2.2.2 Most earthquakes and volcanoes occur in bands that are often along the boundaries between continents and oceans.

    • 4.ESS2.2.3 Major mountain chains form inside continents or near their edges.

    • 4.ESS2.2.4 Maps can help locate the different land and water features where people live and in other areas of Earth.

ESS3 Earth and Human Activity

  • 4.ESS3.1 Obtain and combine information to describe that energy and fuels are derived from renewable and non-renewable resources and how their uses affect the environment.

    • 4.ESS3.1.1 Energy and fuels that humans use are derived from natural sources, and their use affects the environment in multiple ways.

    • 4.ESS3.1.2 Some resources are renewable over time, and others are not.

  • 4.ESS3.2 Generate and compare multiple solutions to reduce the impacts of natural Earth processes on humans.

    • 4.ESS3.2.1 A variety of hazards result from natural processes (e.g., earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions).

    • 4.ESS3.2.2 Humans cannot eliminate the hazards but can take steps to reduce their impacts.

    • 4.ESS3.2.3 Testing a solution involves investigating how well it performs under a range of likely conditions.

    • 4.ESS3.2.4 Engineers improve existing technologies or develop new ones to increase their benefits, to decrease known risks, and to meet societal demands.